Balneotherapy as a promising method for the correction of dermatologic adverse events of cancer therapy

Cover Page


Cite item

Full Text

Open Access Open Access
Restricted Access Access granted
Restricted Access Subscription or Fee Access

Abstract

Cancer treatment with chemotherapy, targeted and immunotherapy is associated with a wide spectrum of dermatologic adverse events. Xerosis (dryness) of the skin is the most prevalent skin side effect in oncologic patients, which occurs both during treatment with "classic" chemotherapy drugs and modern cancer drugs, such as targeted therapy and immunotherapy.

Despite the high prevalence of this side effect, current approaches to the correction of skin xerosis in cancer patients are very limited. At the same time, in the absence of adequate supportive treatment of xerosis, the formation of persistent fissures, eczematization and secondary infection is observed, which may lead to antitumor therapy regimen modification. Thus, optimization of prophylactic and treatment strategies for xerosis in patients treated with anticancer drugs remain an important interdisciplinary problem. Balneotherapy is a promising method for the correction of skin xerosis due to a complex positive effect on the level of skin hydration, a decrease in the intensity of inflammatory processes, a beneficial effect on the state of the skin barrier function, as well as an increase in antimicrobial protection. Available data on the use of balneotherapy in the supportive treatment of skin xerosis as a dermatological adverse event of anticancer therapy confirms the high efficacy and safety, as well as good tolerability of this method in cancer patients.

Full Text

Restricted Access

About the authors

Aleksandra S. Polonskaia

Central State Medical Academy of the Office of the President of the Russian Federation

Author for correspondence.
Email: dr.polonskaia@gmail.com
ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6888-4760
SPIN-code: 8039-4105

MD, Postgraduate Student

Russian Federation, Moscow

Evgeniya A. Shatokhina

Central State Medical Academy of the Office of the President of the Russian Federation; Medical Research and Education Center of Lomonosov Moscow State University

Email: dr.polonskaia@gmail.com
ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0238-6563
SPIN-code: 3827-0100

MD, Dr. Sci. (Med.), Professor

Russian Federation, Moscow; Moscow

Larisa S. Kruglova

Central State Medical Academy of the Office of the President of the Russian Federation

Email: kruglovals@mail.ru
ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5044-5265
SPIN-code: 1107-4372

MD, Dr. Sci. (Med.), Professor

Russian Federation, Moscow

References

  1. Lacouture ME, Sibaud V, Gerber PA, et al. Prevention and management of dermatological toxicities related to anticancer agents: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines. Ann Oncol. 2021;32(2):157–170. doi: 10.1016/j.annonc.2020.11.005
  2. Koroleva IA, Bolotina LV, Gladkov OA, et al. Practical recommendations on the management of dermatologic adverse events in patients, treated with targeted anticancer drugs. Malignant Tumors: Practical Recommendations RUSSCO. 2020;10(3s2):88–101. (In Russ). doi: 10.18027 / 2224-5057-2020-10-3s2-42
  3. Segaert S, Van Cutsem E. Clinical signs, pathophysiology and management of skin toxicity during therapy with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors. Ann Oncol. 2005;16(9):1425–1433. doi: 10.1093/annonc/mdi279
  4. Osio A, Mateus C, Soria JC, et al. Cutaneous side-effects in patients on long-term treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors. Br J Dermatol. 2009;161(3):515–521. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2133.2009.09214.x
  5. Galimont-Collen AF, Vos LE, Lavrijsen AP, et al. Classification and management of skin, hair, nail and mucosal side-effects of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors. Eur J Cancer. 2007;43(5):845–851. doi: 10.1016/j.ejca.2006.11.016
  6. Common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) version 4.0. Published: May 28, 2009 (v.4.03: June 14, 2010) [Internet]. US Department of Health and Human Services; National Institute of Health; National Cancer Institute [cited 2022 Jul 13]. Available from: https://evs.nci.nih.gov/ftp1/CTCAE/CTCAE_4.03/CTCAE_4.03_2010-06-14_QuickReference_8.5x11.pdf.
  7. Michenko AV, Kruglova LS, Shatokhina EA, et al. Dermatological toxicity of EGFR inhibitors: pathogenetic rationale and an algorithm for acne-like rash correction. Oncohematology. 2021;16(4):50–58. (In Russ). doi: 10.17650/1818-8346-2021-16-4-50-58
  8. Roé E, García Muret MP, Marcuello E, et al. Description and management of cutaneous side effects during cetuximab or erlotinib treatments: a prospective study of 30 patients. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2006;55(3):429–437. doi: 10.1016/j.jaad.2006.04.062
  9. Ponomarenko GN. General physiotherapy. 5th ed. Moscow: GEOTAR-Media; 2014. 368 p. (In Russ).
  10. Vorontsova LV. SPA. Guidelines for cosmetologists. Мoscow; 2008. 252 p. (In Russ).
  11. Matsumoto S. Evaluation of the Role of Balneotherapy in Rehabilitation Medicine. J Nippon Med Sch. 2018;85(4):196–203. doi: 10.1272/jnms.JNMS.2018_85-30
  12. Merial-Kieny C, Castex-Rizzi N, Selas B, et al. Avène Thermal Spring Water: an active component with specific properties. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2011;25(Suppl. 1):2–5. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-3083.2010.03892.x
  13. Chebassier N, El Houssein O, Viegas I, Dréno B. Stimulatory effect of boron and manganese salts on keratinocyte migration. Acta Derm Venereol. 2004;84(3):191–194. doi: 10.1080/00015550410025273
  14. Chebassier N, El Houssein O, Viegas I, Dréno B. In vitro induction of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression in keratinocytes by boron and manganese. Exp Dermatol. 2004;13(8):484–490. doi: 10.1111/j.0906-6705.2004.00197.x
  15. Faga A, Nicoletti G, Gregotti C, et al. Effects of thermal water on skin regeneration. Int J Mol Med. 2012;29(5):732–740. doi: 10.3892/ijmm.2012.917
  16. Zöller N, Valesky E, Hofmann M, et al. Impact of Different Spa Waters on Inflammation Parameters in Human Keratinocyte HaCaT Cells. Ann Dermatol. 2015;27(6):709–714. doi: 10.5021/ad.2015.27.6.709
  17. Dechelette C, Belaubre F, Julie S, Charveron M. Avène thermal spring water enhances normal human keratinocyte differentiation. In: World Congress of Dermatology; Buenos Aires; 2007.
  18. Lehen’kyi V, Vandenberghe M, Belaubre F, et al. Acceleration of keratinocyte differentiation by transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV6) channel activation. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2011;25(Suppl. 1):12–18.
  19. Galliano MF, Bäsler K, Caruana A, et al. Protective effect of Aquaphilusdolomiae extract-G1, ADE-G1, on tight junction barrier function in a Staphylococcus aureus-infected atopic dermatitis model. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2020;34(Suppl. 5):30–36. doi: 10.1111/jdv.16516
  20. Eliasse Y, Redoules D, Espinosa E. Impact of Avène Thermal Spring Water on immune cells. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2020;34(Suppl. 5):21–26. doi: 10.1111/jdv.16335
  21. Mahé YF, Martin R, Aubert L, et al. Induction of the skin endogenous protective mitochondrial MnSOD by Vitreoscilla filiformis extract. Int J Cosmet Sci. 2006;28(4):277–287. doi: 10.1111/j.14672494.2006.00333.x
  22. Mahe YF, Perez MJ, Tacheau C, et al. A new Vitreoscilla filiformis extract grown on spa water enriched medium activates endogenous cutaneous antioxidant and antimicrobial defenses through a potential Toll-like receptor 2/protein kinase C, zeta transduction pathway. Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol. 2013;6:191–196. doi: 10.2147/CCID.S47324
  23. Kruglova LS, Shatokhina EA, Kotenko KV, Korchazhkina NB. The use of the physical therapy methods for the rehabilitation of the patients presenting with cancer pathology. Russian Journal of Physiotherapy, Balneology and Rehabilitation. 2016;15(2):97–101. (In Russ). doi: 10.18821/1681-3456-2016-15-2-97-101
  24. Persiyanova-Dubrova AL, Badalov NG, Kavunenko DV. The specific methodological features of scientific research in the field of balneotherapy. Problems of Balneology, Physiotherapy, and Exercise Therapy. 2019;96(1):63–68. (In Russ). doi: 10.17116/kurort20199601163
  25. Dalenc F, Ribet V, Rossi AB, et al. Efficacy of a global supportive skin care programme with hydrotherapy after non-metastatic breast cancer treatment: A randomised, controlled study. Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2018;27(1). doi: 10.1111/ecc.12735

Supplementary files

Supplementary Files
Action
1. Fig. 1. Xerosis cutis of the right arm, associated with cancer therapy. Lichenification, white small scales on the skin surface, erythema.

Download (50KB)
2. Fig. 2. Upper back xerosis cutis, associated with targeted cancer therapy with gefitinib (epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor). Lichenification, white small scales on the skin surface, pinpoint and linear excoriations.

Download (76KB)

Copyright (c) 2022 Eco-Vector



СМИ зарегистрировано Федеральной службой по надзору в сфере связи, информационных технологий и массовых коммуникаций (Роскомнадзор).
Регистрационный номер и дата принятия решения о регистрации СМИ: 77 - 9245 от 22.06.2001
СМИ зарегистрировано Федеральной службой по надзору в сфере связи, информационных технологий и массовых коммуникаций (Роскомнадзор).
Регистрационный номер и дата принятия решения о регистрации СМИ: серия ЭЛ № ФС 77 - 80650 от 15.03.2021
г.



This website uses cookies

You consent to our cookies if you continue to use our website.

About Cookies